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Environmental Science and Geology

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

GPS/Mapping Internship Program, City and Borough of Juneau (CBJ) and UAS

The City and Borough of Juneau (CBJ) and UAS are offering up to 3 paid internships to help CBJ map city infrastructure, starting by May 15 2016, possibly as early as May 1 2016 depending on the candidate and needs. The duties include working semi-independently to collect GPS locations of city infrastructure with Trimble GPS units, some possible GIS, and assistance with data management.  GPS and GIS skills preferred; and more advanced GPS training is also an expected outcome. The internship is 37.5 hours / week, lasts from May to August 2016, and pays in the neighborhood of $15 to $17 / hour, depending on experience/qualifications. Interested candidates should first contact Sanjay Pyare spyare@uas.alaska.edu with a brief statement of interests, experience, and qualifications no later than Friday April 29, 2016.   

Sanjay Pyare 01:16:44 PM
Monday, April 18, 2016

Alaska Community Foundation scholarships

The Alaska Community Foundation offers several scholarships which may be relevant to students in the ENVS and GEOG programs. Some of them have submission deadlines this month.

Information on the scholarships can be found here: http://alaskacf.org/scholarships/

Jason Amundson 09:25:20 AM
Thursday, March 03, 2016

summer field courses in Southeast Alaska

Summer field courses and research in Southeast Alaska! – Tatoosh School

*Apply now - Scholarships Available*

Learn more and apply at http://tatooshschool.org

The Tatoosh School is a nonprofit, university-level field school with a beachfront base camp on Prince of Wales Island and lecture halls in the towns, oceans, and forests of Alaska’s Inside Passage. It is the school’s mission to foster first-hand learning about the ecology and environmental policy of southern Southeast Alaska.

Rigorous academics focus on the development of a sense of place, a passion for civic engagement and a sound knowledge of the Pacific coastal ecoregion. You can earn up to 12 units of credit and leave empowered to explore your surroundings with wide-eyed curiosity and to reach out as an active and informed citizen. 

Students are field scientists and participate in several long-term ecological research programs in collaboration with our partners. Gain invaluable experience and professional connections that can last a lifetime.

Choose from 4 summer programs in 2016:

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3-week Intensive I: May 16 – June 7, 2016

Community Ecology: Salmon, People, Place

This 3-week intensive focuses on the communities that inhabit the heart of the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Conceived broadly, the course theme of community ecology launches explorations from the outer coast to the Inside Passage to study interactions at varying scales and across biological, social, biophysical, and cultural boundaries.

Course description: Students develop an understanding of key ecological principals of aquatic and terrestrial systems, from the nearshore intertidal zone to the high alpine. This class also examines the adaptations and relationships of organisms to their environments over time and space. A community ecology lens adds consideration of organizations and networks on the landscape and in human communities, enhancing students’ knowledge of resiliency and sustainability in the ecoregion. (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510)

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6-week Summer Session: June 15 – July 28, 2016

Core Session

The Core Session expedition includes two upper-division classes taken concurrently, one in ecology and a second in natural resource policy.

Aquatic & Terrestrial Ecology of Southeast Alaska (4 semester or 6 quarter units). Students develop an understanding of key ecological principals of aquatic and terrestrial systems, from the nearshore intertidal zone to the high alpine. This class also examines the adaptations and relationships of organisms to their environments over time and space.

Politics of Place: Southeast Alaska (4 semester or 6 quarter units). Topics include land ownership, public and private land management, conservation strategies, local and regional economies, Alaska Native cultures and communities, and contemporary resource management issues. A focus is placed on the evolution of social and legal structures, and how these structures guide current decision-making.  Inquiry and reason are applied to real-life challenges, and students engage with citizens and policymakers to consider solutions.

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3-week Intensive II:  August 2 – August 20, 2016

Stewardship of Salmon Rivers & Anan Bears

There is nothing quite like casting a fly to the schools of salmon and feeding char and trout in the heart of the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. The crown jewel of the national forest system, the Tongass includes 17,000 miles of clean, undammed creeks, rivers, and lakes with short runs to the sea. The forest is a fishing paradise, and salmon sustain local culture and rural ways of life. Salmon and trout contribute an estimated $1 billion to the regional economy; stewardship of their habitat is necessary work. The time to learn about and engage in this work is now.

The SSR Intensive II will begin with a day at Anan Bear Observatory, one of just a few bear observatories in Alaska that experts describe as “the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion all packed like magic in a square mile of estuary and creek.”  Shoulder-to-shoulder with salmon, fishing brown and black bears and their cubs, eagles, ravens, otter, and seals, the Observatory is operated by the US Forest Service; students and faculty are guided for the day by a world-class outfitter and TS board member. Following Anan, the SSR Intensive II will boat to Prince of Wales Island, and set out on a 4-5 day expedition in the Prince of Wales Island archipelago. The remainder of SSR will be spent in the communities of Coffman Cove and Klawock and in the forests and rivers of the Island. Classes will be interdisciplinary, conducted in both lecture- and activity-based formats. In addition, students will hear lectures from experts from across the region, adding to their rich understanding of the diversity of perspectives, challenges, and opportunities in the field.

*Note that this course carries an additional $300 transport fee.

Course Description:

Stewardship of Salmon Rivers (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510) This intensive course examines the physical, biological, economic and political frameworks essential to informed stewardship of salmon-producing watersheds and healthy forests in the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Coursework engages the fields of hydrology, geology, geomorphology, biology, political science, and economics to develop students’ understanding of integrated watershed stewardship. Students practice stream and forest survey and monitoring techniques that contribute to long-term collaborative stewardship work while gaining valuable field research experience.

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3-week Intensive III: August 29 – September 19, 2015

Stewardship of Salmon Rivers

With 990 miles of coastline, thriving runs of wild salmon, and strong communities that depend on the forest and sea around them, Prince of Wales Island is a lecture hall like no other.  Multiple-use forest management has affected the integrity of salmon-bearing streams in Southeastern Alaska, and the effects of a dynamic climate are playing out each year.  Local land managers, nonprofit partners, Alaska Native communities, businesses and citizens are actively working to care for the salmon landscape.  While many river systems on the Island are relatively intact, the time to learn about – and engage in – integrative stewardship of salmon rivers is now.

Course description: This intensive course examines the physical, biological, economic and political frameworks essential to informed stewardship of salmon-producing watersheds in the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Coursework engages the fields of hydrology, geology, geomorphology, biology, political science, and economics to develop students’ understanding of integrated watershed stewardship.  Students practice stream survey and monitoring techniques that contribute to long-term collaborative stewardship work while gaining valuable field research experience. (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510)

Learn more and apply at http://tatooshschool.org

Questions? peter@tatooshschool.org or 503.347.2599

Like us on Facebook for the latest updates, videos & photos http://facebook.com/tatooshschool

Jason Amundson 12:38:08 PM
 
 

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