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Check the campus-wide events calendar for a complete listing.  

The Egan Library’s lower level is used for public and private events and regularly features Evening at Egan Lectures, concerts (Juneau Symphony, Juneau Jazz and Classics) and conferences.  There is seating in place for 140 and room for ~60 more chairs. The space can be configured with tables for more formal seating at additional cost.  Those interested in using the space should see our Facility Use Policy page.

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The traveling exhibition, produced by the National Library of Medicine, explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians through a combination of interviews with Native people, artwork, objects, and interactive media.  Visitors will discover how Native concepts of health and illness are closely tied to the concepts of community, spirit, and the land.  Honoring the native tradition of oral history, the exhibition features personal stories from native people across the country.  The exhibition will be open to the public in the Egan Library beginning Friday September 11th through December 13th during library open hours.   UAS faculty interested in providing tours for their fall term classes, please contact Public Services Librarian, Jonas Lamb (contact info below).  Portions of the exhibit can be viewed online (link below). 
Sponsor:UAS Egan Library, One Campus One Book, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Health & Human Services
Phone:907-796-6440
Email:
Website:https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/index.html
Learn about all of the tools and collections available in the library in a fun and interactive afternoon of games and prizes!
Sponsor:Egan Library
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6300
Email:
Website:www.uas.alaska.edu/library
Sponsored by Sealaska Heritage Institute.  (Information and photo from Dalton's website Raven Feathers & the Wind)  Rooted in Naparyarmiut (Hooper Bay), born in Bethel and raised in Anchorage, Alaska, Jack Dalton has grown up an ambassador between two worlds, his Yup'ik and European heritages. A professional storyteller, writer and teacher, Jack has been honored by the World Indigenous Peoples' Conference on Education as a Distinguished Dignitary, and considered by many people around the world, to be "The Storyteller." He was chosen as one of Alaska’s Top 40 Under Forty, one of the top forty business people in Alaska under the age of 40. He also received the first Expressive Arts grant from the National Museum of the American Indian to co-create the first Yup'ik opera with friend and world-famous Yup'ik music group, Pamyua co-founder, Stephen Blanchett. He's created and produced five theatrical works of storytelling, written a book, several plays and created curricula used in all levels of education.  Performing throughout Alaska and the US, he has also performed in New Zealand, France, Denmark, Australia and headlined the Scottish Int'l Storytelling Festival in Scotland. At residencies in schools across the country, he teaches the importance of storytelling to the continuation of all cultures and works with students to create their own stories, thus, continuing the tradition. He also speaks Swedish fluently and carries a great deal of wisdom for one still considered young. Raven Feathers & the Wind is based in Anchorage, where he has called home for most of his life.
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://www.ravenfeathers.com/
Nick Jans was born the son of a career diplomat and spent 12 of his first 13 years overseas—first Palermo, Sicily, then Vienna, Austria, and finally Thailand from 1962-67. His father was the American consul in Udorn Thani, a forward CIA and special operations base for missions into Laos, and later on, into North Vietnam. He attended high school in the Washington DC area and graduated in 1977 from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, with a degree in English Literature. Though mostly raised in cities, Jans had always dreamed of living in a wilderness setting, and set out for Alaska in 1979. After an 800 mile canoe trip, he settled in a remote Eskimo village on the upper Kobuk River in northwest arctic Alaska, 200 miles off the road grid. Jans worked for a hunting guide, managed a trading post, and then became a schoolteacher to Inupiat Eskimo children in the local school. But his first love was always the seemingly limitless, wild country that surrounded him, and the creatures that roamed it. In 20 years of living in the region, Jans travelled tens of thousands of wilderness miles by skiff, canoe, on foot, skis, and snowmobile, often alone. In 1986 he took a year off to study writing at University of Washington’s Graduate School of Creative Writing, and began a career as a professional nature photographer and writer. Nick Jans is the author of 11 books and hundreds of magazine articles over the years, and has contributed to many anthologies.  He is a long-time contributing editor to Alaska Magazine, and a member of USA Today’s board of editorial contributors. Jans currently lives on a semi-remote homesite up the Haines Highway in Southeast Alaska with his wife, Sherrie, and their four dogs. “A Wolf Called Romeo” is his latest book.
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://www.nickjans.com/
Part of the Juneau World Affairs Council's Forum on the Politics of Water.  Biographical information and photo from McGeorge School of Law website: "Stephen C. McCaffrey is a Distinguished Professor of Law. One of the world’s foremost authorities on international water law, he served as special rapporteur for the International Law Commission’s draft articles on the law of the non-navigational uses of international watercourses, which formed the basis of the 1997 U.N. Convention on the subject. Professor McCaffrey was Counselor on International Law in the State Department in 1984-85 and represents countries in disputes before the International Court of Justice and other fora. He also advises Palestine in connection with the Permanent Status talks with Israel."
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://jwac.org/index.html
Collaboration is at the heart of every successful project, organization, family and relationship. In an interdependent world, working together is critical. Why can collaboration be so difficult at times? How do we transform competition and conflict into effective collaboration and cooperation in every aspect of our busy lives? What can an individual do to overcome the barriers and strengthen the spirit of collaboration? How do we learn to create peace within ourselves? Kathleen and Jared will explore the qualities that make collaboration effective and share practical, learnable processes that invite each person to be part of a team. Featuring speakers Kathleen Macferran and Jared Finkelstein, Certified Trainers with the Center for Nonviolent Communication. 
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://strengthofconnection.com/
How can new media platforms including video games be used effectively to tell traditional stories in order preserve indigenous language and culture for younger generations?  An interdisciplinary panel featuring Ishmael Hope and Amy Fredeen two of the cultural ambassadors behind Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna), winner of the 2015 British Academy Games Award: Best Debut, as well as game designers from E-Line Media/Upper One Games.”    
Sponsor:One Campus One Book, UAS Egan Library
Campus:Juneau Campus
Author of the 2015-16 One Campus One Book selection, Blonde Indian: An Alaska Native Memoir, Hayes will read and discuss her book and explore the theme of the animistic worldview that is such a part of Tlingit being yet somehow dislocated and dismissed by other cultures. Ernestine was born to the Wolf House, Tlingit Kaagwaantaan clan in Alaska at the end of World War II. In Blonde Indian, an Alaska Native Memoir, she weaves reminiscences of her life, stories from her grandmother, Tlingit history, nature writing, and fiction into a testament of the twentieth-century Alaska Native experience and a love song to the land. In 2007, Blonde Indian received an American Book Award and Honoring Alaska Indigenous Literature award, was named October 2006 Native America Calling Book of the Month, and was a finalist for the 2007 Kiriyama Prize and the 2007 PEN Non-fiction Award.  She received her MFA in creative writing and literary arts from the University of Alaska Anchorage and is currently Assistant Professor of English at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. 
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://www.uas.alaska.edu/library/ocob.html
Author of the 2015-16 One Campus One Book selection, Blonde Indian: An Alaska Native Memoir, Hayes will read and discuss her book and explore the theme of the animistic worldview that is such a part of Tlingit being yet somehow dislocated or dismissed by other cultures.
Sponsor:UAS One Campus One Book, UAS Egan Library
Campus:Juneau Campus
Phone:907-796-6440
Email:
Website:http://uas.alaska.edu/ocob/
Professor of Biology Sherry Tamone was awarded a Fulbright Research Award through the United States-Israel Educational Foundation (USIEF) to study at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel from February through May of this year.  The award was in support her research on crustacean molecular endocrinology. Tamone will speak about her work with Dr. Amir Sagi and his students to isolate a gene from Tanner crab androgenic gland that regulates sexual differentiation. This gene is important for male development and should play a role in establishing the terminal molt of Tanner and snow crabs.  Dr. Sagi is the leading expert on the hormonal regulation of development and sex determination and has won multiple prestigious awards for his research.  Tamone brought her analytical skills to Dr. Sagi’s lab to work towards developing a functional assay for the androgenic gland hormone. Tamone lived in Beersheva during her study and commuted by bicycle each day to the medical school.  As part of this Fulbright Award, she was able to explore the culture and historical landmarks in and near Israel including Petra (Jordon), Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa.
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
Website:http://www.uas.alaska.edu/dir/sltamone.html
(Tentative)  Haa Yoo X̲ʼatángi K̲áx̲ K̲ulagaawú is a film that documents the work and lives of Richard and Nora Dauenhauer and celebrates Tlingit language revitalization.  The Dauenhauers were instrumental in the design and implementation of the UAS Alaska Native Languages and Culture program. Lance Twitchell, who heads the program, said “Everything we’re doing there is really made possible by Richard and Nora Dauenhauer.”  In addition to their distinguished service to UAS, both were appointed as Alaska State Writer Laureate, Richard in 1981 and Nora in 2012.  NOTE:This film is currently in production.  If completed in time to be part of Evening at Egan it will premiere on November 20.  However, if it is not yet completed at that time, a future screening date will be planned outside of the Evening at Egan schedule.  In the event that the film is not ready for screening on this date, an alternate presentation on Alaska Native Languages and Culture will be planned in its place.
Sponsor:Chancellor's Office
Campus:Juneau Campus
Cost:FREE
Phone:796-6509
Email:
 
 
 

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