Skip to Main Content

Evening at Egan

Evening at Egan
Fall 2021

Join us online for Evening at Egan, the annual UAS lecture series held each fall.

Watch the live-streamed presentations with Zoom; a great way to fully participate and ask questions to our expert presenters. (Select events will also be recorded and posted on the UAS YouTube Channel for future viewing.)

To attend a lecture, select the buttons below. A confirmation email will be sent to you with information on how to join the Zoom session.

Upcoming Presentations

X̱ʼunei Lance Twitchell, Gax̱.áan.sán Lorrie Heagy, Koolyéik Roby Littlefield, George Holly, Meghan Johnson

X̱ʼunei Lance Twitchell, Gax̱.áan.sán Lorrie Heagy, Koolyéik Roby Littlefield, George Holly, Meghan Johnson

Evening at Egan: Woosh Jín Tulshát Yeisú: Weʼre Still Holding Each Others’ Hands - Lingít Language Revitalization in a Musical Context

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Over the past year, the presenters have been working with a team of Lingít speakers, language teachers, and music teachers to develop methods for teaching violin through Lingít. Even though this is a new area for the language, the team has focused on bringing Lingít tundatáani—the Lingít thought world—into the pedagogy, which is transforming the way music is being taught at Sítʼ Eetí Shaanáx̱ (Glacier Valley Elementary). By taking the language to new places, they have collaborated to increase access to language learning and to incorporate the use of Lingít in a new subject area. In this reflection on the work, the presenters will cover current initiatives in Lingít language revitalization, an overview of teaching violin using Lingít, and the process of language modernization.
Free Registration Evening at Egan: Woosh Jín Tulshát Yeisú: Weʼre Still Holding Each Others’ Hands - Lingít Language Revitalization in a Musical ContextAfter registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Past Presentations

Dr. Heidi Pearson, Associate Professor of Marine Biology

Dr. Heidi Pearson, Associate Professor of Marine Biology

Humpback Whales and Tourism in Juneau – What Can We Learn from the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Time: 7:00 p.m.

The cancellation of cruise ships during Summer 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic provided an unprecedented opportunity to assess humpback whales in the near absence of whale-watching vessels near Juneau. Heidi Pearson will present her collaborative study with UAF and NOAA to assess humpback whale residency patterns and stress hormone levels during this unusual time.

Mischa Jackson - Chookangee Tláa, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education

Mischa Jackson - Chookangee Tláa, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education

Alaska Native Education: The Power of Acknowledgment

Time: 7:00 p.m.

The current disruptions to education have led to passionate conversations analyzing the status of the education system and student success across the state and the nation. This presents a unique opportunity for parallel conversations about the history of disruptions to Alaska Native education systems and their impacts. Mischa will share her perspective and understandings of the history of Alaska Native education as well as explore the power of acknowledgment. Focusing on its role as an inherent value of Indigenous communities, and the role it can play in school systems wanting to create space for our students to thrive.

Political Scientist Professor Benjamin Reilly, University of Western Australia

Political Scientist Professor Benjamin Reilly, University of Western Australia

Ranked choice voting: what is it, how does it work, and will it change Alaskan politics?

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Following its adoption by ballot initiative last year, Alaska’s future state and national elections will be held under Ranked Choice Voting, allowing voters to specify not just their favoured candidate but also their second, third and fourth choices. This system is gaining ground across the US and has been used for over a century in Australia, home of Prof Reilly. He is visiting Juneau for his research and will discuss how Ranked Choice Voting works; its implications for voters, candidates and political parties; and what insights from comparative experience suggests for how the new system may impact Alaskan politics.
Dr. Elizabeth Graham, Entomologist,  USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection

Dr. Elizabeth Graham, Entomologist, USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection

Western blackheaded budworm: a tiny moth that orchestrates change in an old growth forest

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Western blackheaded budworms are a natural part of the forests in Southeast Alaska. Typically their populations are low and damage is negligible, but every 30 to 40 years their numbers build up and they become the most significant disturbance agent in the forest. An outbreak is currently underway with damage visible in most communities throughout Southeast Alaska. A look back at previous outbreaks and the impacts will be reviewed as well as the status of the current outbreak.
Wendy F. Smythe, Ph.D., Xáadas

Wendy F. Smythe, Ph.D., Xáadas

The Science in Our Stories: Connection To Place, Belonging, and Security For Native Students In STEM Education

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Water is life. A familiar phrase frequently spoken today. We exist in water throughout our lives dependent on it from conception, until our last water vapor breath. Indigenous peoples around the world maintain an intricate relationship with water. It is considered to possess beinghood, with rights. This importance is reflected in traditional ecological knowledge, passed through the generations in oral traditions as creation stories. Lessons in that hold true even today, thousands of years after they were first spoken, because our human dependence on water has not changed. Science curriculum and western-based pedagogies within mainstream education systems do not reflect the true nature of Indigenous knowledge systems nor the deep connections Traditional knowledge systems have developed over thousands of years. The absence of this knowledge base can inadvertently communicate a deficit-based STEM identity, which can directly impact Native youths’ participation and engagement in STEM. Acknowledging the importance of students’ connection to place and incorporating that connection into STEM education provides a familiar and safe space for STEM learning, builds confidence in students STEM identity, and provides historical context for Traditional Knowledge systems.

Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson, President, Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson, President, Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

The Interrelationships between Tribes, Corporations, and City, State and Federal Governments

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Chalyee Éesh will speak about the interrelationships between tribes, corporations, and city, state and federal governments. He will discuss understanding tribal sovereignty and being good neighbors. He will also talk about how healthy tribes make healthy communities.

Joel Markis, Associate Professor and Program Director, Applied Fisheries

Joel Markis, Associate Professor and Program Director, Applied Fisheries

Fisheries, Aquaculture and Mariculture in Southeast Alaska

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Markis will discuss why fisheries are important, especially in Alaska. He will provide a history of Alaskan fishery enhancement and aquaculture in Alaska.  An overview of mariculture will include information about species that are cultivated in Alaska, production numbers in Alaska and nationwide.  

Dr. Megan Buzby, Associate Professor of Mathematics

Dr. Megan Buzby, Associate Professor of Mathematics

The `Real' World, from One Mathematician's Point of View

Time: 7:00 p.m.

What does a mathematics professor do on sabbatical?  This one co-wrote an open-access textbook for mathematical modeling.  Mathematical modeling is the process of describing phenomena found in the real world using mathematics.  The more mathematical tools you have under your belt and the more you learn about the world around you, the more possibilities you have for describing and analyzing a changing system from this quantitative perspective.  One could and should ask what may be learned from a quantitative approach, and what details are inherently lost or camouflaged.  In this talk, I will give you some insight into one professor's sabbatical, provide examples of some useful mathematical models with mostly biological applications, discuss the inherent assumptions that go into developing these models, and the interesting outcomes that follow.  All are welcome!
Jason Gootee

Jason Gootee

Health Insurance in Alaska

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Jason Gootee will provide a look at the 2022 environment for health insurance in Alaska. Gootee has worked for more than 15 years in the health insurance industry and is widely recognized as a thought leader and civic influencer, deeply committed to helping communities transform the way they provide and pay for healthcare. He currently serves as Vice President of Strategic Market Development at Moda Partners, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and serves on the UA Foundation Board of Directors.
Dr. Pearl Brower and Ronalda Cadiente Brown

Dr. Pearl Brower and Ronalda Cadiente Brown

Alaska Native Success Initiative

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Dr. Brower and Ms. Cadiente Brown will discuss their work with Southeast Alaskan leaders on the Alaska Native Success Initiative for UA. This project seeks to improve the participation and success of Alaska Natives through educational achievement statewide, as well as Alaska Native representation and success throughout the University of Alaska system. Pearl and Ronalda have led the UAS committee comprised of leaders from Alaska Native corporations, tribal entities, and other southeast organizations. Dr. Pearl Brower is the UA Senior Advisor for Alaska Native Success, Institutional Diversity, and Student Engagement.  Ronalda Cadiente Brown is the UAS Associate Vice Chancellor for Alaska Native Programs, as well as the Director of the PITAAS Program (Preparing Indigenous Teachers and Administrators for Alaska's Schools). 

Renee Tl'aagunk Culp, Juvenile Justice Coordinator, Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Renee Tl'aagunk Culp, Juvenile Justice Coordinator, Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

I too yei yatee - It is within you: Generational Trauma & Resiliency

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Generational trauma is a well-known concept within trauma-informed care, a lesser-known concept, generational resilience is an important topic to add to the discussion. It must be, that for me to survive, even thrive beyond these traumas, I must also hold generational resilience deep within me. We will explore building, honoring, and uplifting resilience in students, while considering how generational resilience may be experienced within youth and their families.

The partnership between the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) and UAS to strengthen Northwest Coast Arts programming and degree tracks in higher education

Time: 7:00 p.m.

The talk features:

  • Robert Martin, IAIA President
  • Felipe Colón, IAIA Academic Dean / Associate Professor of Museum Studies
  • Kari Groven, SHI Art Director
  • Carin Silkaitis, UAS Dean of Arts and Sciences / Professor of Humanities
  • Robert Mills, Adjunct instructor of Northwest Coast Design

The presenters will speak about the vision behind the partnership, and opportunities that are currently available and in the works for people who wish to pursue a degree with Northwest Coast (NWC) Arts as their emphasis.

To give the audience a small taste of what is at the heart of the NWC Arts programming at SHI, UAS, and IAIA, a portion of the session will include a condensed sample introduction to formline-design presented by award winning artist and IAIA/UAS Adjunct instructor Robert Mills.

Related Links:

IAIA:

SHI:

UAS:

Robert Ganakw Mills: